The Future of Mobile Phone Banking in the Philippines: Updates from Globe GCASH (part 2 of 3)

PBaltao

During the second part of the session on the future of mobile phone banking in the Philippines, Paolo Baltao, President of Globe’s G-Xchange Inc. (GXI) announced their continuing collaboration with the USAID-supported RBAP-MABS Program on various new products and promotions for GCASH accredited rural banks. This would further promote and expand mobile phone banking services utilizing the GCASH platform.  To make it easier for clients to cash-out their GCASH funds, GXI has partnered with RBAP-MABS to offer a specialized ATM card that doubles as a photo ID card called the Rural Bank FaceCard.

Rural Bank Facecard from John Owens on Vimeo.

Under the new initiative, interested and accredited rural banks will be able to identify and tap the most influential people in their communities, such as the president of the tricycle drivers or vendors association, church or community leaders, heads of civic organizations, doctors, dentists, or other leading professionals in the community to share the benefits of obtaining a FaceCard in order to make it easier to access their bank account through GCASH and ATMs.

In addition, GXI also highlighted a new initiative launched during the Roundtable Conference for salary employees called GCash PowerPay+.  This initiative is geared for all employees receiving their salaries via Text-A-Sweldo, whether bank employees or employees of companies that have payroll service agreements with the bank.

View more presentations from MABSIV

Mr. Baltao also shared the expected expansion of GCASH to facilitate the government’s Conditional Cash Transfer program called Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) and he encouraged more banks to participate to support these efforts and also to benefit from the increasing use of GCASH in the countryside.  He also expressed how impressed Globe is with the strong partnership with the rural banking sector.

The Future of Mobile Phone Banking in the Philippines: Updates from RBAP-MABS (part 1 of 3)

During the USAID-supported Rural Bankers Association of the Philippines – Microenterprise Access to Banking Services (RBAP-MABS) Roundtable Conference held last November 9, 2011 at Hyatt Hotel in Manila featured updates on mobile phone banking for rural banks as well as new global trends. During the conference, Mr. Petalcorin gave updates on the RBAP-MABS Program Mobile Phone Banking Services initiative: including various recent accreditation trainings for rural banks in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao regions for both GCASH and Smart Money platforms as well as lessons learned during the Mobile Phone Banking Channel Management pilot.  Some of the important lessons we have learned over the past year include:

  • How rural banks can make effective use of merchant-partners as cash in / cash out (CICO) outlets to further promote the registration of mobile phone banking customers as well as to better promote the various uses of mobile money to support access to banking services;
  • How rural banks can provide liquidity to CICO outlets in order to better maintain the outlets mobile money float and to better support access to mobile money cash-in and cash-out services for the bank’s mobile phone banking client base;
  • The importance of focusing on the appropriate “use cases” in promoting mobile phone banking uptake;
  • The growing importance of the Philippine government’s support for Government to Person (G2P) transfers using mobile money such as DSWD’s “Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program” conditional cash transfer program that utilizes GCASH;
  • The continuous issuance and updates from the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas which continue to enable and expand the various uses of mobile money platforms to support greater access to banking services.

Mobile Banking Updates from MABSIV

View more presentations from MABSIV

RBAP-MABS also shared new developments in the area of  financial education to promote mobile phone banking services of rural bank clients. The financial education initiative, which is supported by Microfinance Opportunities and the MasterCard Foundation (view article), aims to promote the benefits of shifting from traditional over-the-counter banking to mobile phone banking. The initiative involves the development of a financial education toolkit, which will be used by bank staff to teach clients and merchants about the benefits of mobile phone banking as well as to address frequently asked questions in order to promote uptake and usage.

As of end-October 2011, RBAP-MABS has helped accredit more than 1,100 participating rural bank branches to offer mobile phone banking services, benefiting over 311,000 clients while processing more than PhP12 billion (US$275 million) in mobile phone banking transactions since 2006. Included in these figures are over 100,000 recipients of the Philippine government’s conditional cash transfer program Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps).

Mobile Money Webinar: Coping with Dormancy

MMExplainedLive_650x122_v2The third instalment of the Mobile Money Explained Live Webinar series is scheduled on the 17th of January at 2:30pm UK time (10:30pm MNL time).

One of the biggest issues facing mobile money providers at the moment is how to cope with dormancy. Maintaining high usage rates, especially in increasingly competitive markets, is not easy and after initial spikes in subscriptions, many service providers are faced with a vast number of dormant accounts on their hands.

This webinar defines methods for protecting your program from dormancy. It will explore the useability of the service, the breadth of the product suite on offer, competitive pricing, and effective ongoing marketing strategies that will encourage continual usage. Joining Graham Wright fromMicroSave on this webinar will be Aleeda Fazal from Sicap.

Register free of charge at – http://tinyurl.com/mobile-money-webinar-register

To view previous webinars, simply follow the links below:

Webinar 1 – Effective pricing models and customer willingness to pay
Webinar 2 – Beyond remittances: How to expand your mobile money product suite

Webinar 1 – Effective pricing models and customer willingness to pay

Webinar 2 – Beyond remittances: How to expand your mobile money product suite

Smarter than a smartphone?

FinanceAsia – Mobile telephone capabilities may have come a long way since the days of the brick-size device, but how much can they really change banking?

Communicating through radio link has come a long way since World War II. With voice calls, text messages, mobile internet access and built-in cameras, today’s smartphone is already a remarkable all-in-one handheld computer — but its potential could be even greater in the developing world.

This is particularly true in banking. Asia’s fragmented payments infrastructure and large unbanked population mean that millions lack even limited access to branch-based banking, but rising mobile penetration is creating new options for person-to-person payments.

“Mobile banking works because the individuals and small businesses in the emerging markets have access to a mobile phone,” said Richard Davies, Asia-Pacific director of Logica’s global products business. “Similarly, in the more mature markets, it would be strange to see somebody who does not own a smartphone.”

Telecommunications service providers have been quick to pick up on this trend. Mobile banking and payments solutions, such as GCash in the Philippines and MPesa in Kenya, have been very successful in the emerging markets. “Banks in Southeast Asia are interested in mobile banking to get ahead of the game and provide additional services for their customers,” said Dean Young, vice president of product management at SunGard’s ambit retail banking business arm.

You can read the full article at http://www.financeasia.com/News/281489,smarter-than-a-smartphone.aspx/

Rural Banks Providing Financial Education in Branchless Banking

By Cheryl Lualhati Balingit, RBAP-MABS Special Projects Coordinator

In Filipino grammar, adding the prefix mag is a nifty way to verbalize a noun. This extends from everyday, colloquial conversation Mag-kape tayo (Let’s have coffee) Mag-sine tayo (Let’s watch a movie) to more profound exhortations, like Mag-bago na tayo. (It’s time we make a change). The United States Agency for International Development-supported Rural Bankers Association of the Philippines Microenterprise Access to Banking Services (RBAP-MABS) Program with assistance from Microfinance Opportunities (MFO) is now assisting rural banks to extend this further to promote mobile phone banking services with the launch of mag-CellBank! and the pilot testing of the Financial Education for Branchless Banking Project.

mag-CellBank!, the new logo for mobile phone banking services, employs the prefix mag to cell (for cellphone) and bank. Mag-CellBank! is an enthusiastic call for clients to perform banking transactions using their cellphones. The new name, along with a visual identity, is integrated into the new Financial Education for Branchless Banking toolkit that is currently being used by three pilot banks – GM Bank, Cantilan Bank, and 1st Valley Bank. mag-CellBank! services include Text-A-Payment (TAP), Text-A-Deposit (TAD), Text-A-Withdrawal (TAW), and phone-to-phone transfers and payments.

mag-cellbankLaunched in June 2010, the Financial Education for Branchless Banking Project is implemented by the RBAP-MABS Program with support from MFO, a Washington-based global nonprofit that develops consumer-focused ideas and solutions for the microfinance industry. The project, which is implemented in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation, aims to increase the uptake and use of mobile phone banking services through the use of financial education tools.

The dissemination and use of the toolkit rounds up close to a year of work and preparation.

Earlier this year, MABS and MFO conducted focus group discussions and interviews with target groups and individuals to gather sufficient information for the design of the financial education program’s content and delivery strategy. The results showed the information gaps and users’ fears that needed to be addressed to encourage trial and eventual adoption of mobile phone banking services. The challenges facing bank staff in promoting MPBS also surfaced, with the lack of training and teaching materials as among the most pressing. The study also brought to light the need for materials for the use of banks’ cash-in/cash-out (CICO) partner-merchants. CICOs are businesses, usually neighborhood sari-sari (variety) stores, where clients can cash-in (change cash to GCASH) or cash-out (change GCASH to cash).

The toolkit comprises:

  1. Two posters (promoting Text-A-Payment and Text-A-Deposit) designed to be displayed in bank branch lobbies and storefronts of CICOs;
  2. A tri-fold standee for CICOs’ countertops and display areas;
  3. A two-sided standee for banks’ countertops;
  4. An all-in-one user’s manual which contains step-by-step instructions for completing transactions, a section teaching clients how to make savings plans and savings goals, with pages where clients can set up their own savings plan and goal, a frequently asked questions and troubleshooting section which highlights the safety features of the service; and a table where clients can record their mag-CellBank transaction details;
  5. A picture flipbook, that utilizes storytelling to communicate the benefits of mag-Cellbank and outlines the procedure for completing transactions as well as stories for how and why to use a mobile phone for loan payments and for deposits.

The tools highlight the positioning of mag-CellBank! as helping rural bank clients save time and money. Microloan borrowers do not need to travel to the bank to pay their loan amortizations. Using mag-CellBank/Text-A-Payment, they can pay their loans from wherever they are. Since they do not need to travel to the bank, they save on time and transportation costs. Through Text-A-Deposit, depositors can deposit to their account as frequently as they want and in small amounts. Because they can easily and conveniently make deposits, clients can build up their savings and avoid spending their savings on non-essential purchases. While Text-A-Withdrawal allows them to conveniently make withdrawals without having to come to the bank.

Account officers have come to dread stretches (left photo) like this that passes through heavily forested areas – these are sites of several highway robberies and hold-ups. On the right is the common mode of transport in and out of Baungon; note the dusty roadside. During the summer, passengers endure a virtual dust storm as vehicles blow out dust.

Account officers have come to dread stretches (left photo) like this that passes through heavily forested areas – these are sites of several highway robberies and hold-ups. On the right is the common mode of transport in and out of Baungon; note the dusty roadside. During the summer, passengers endure a virtual dust storm as vehicles blow out dust.

The tools highlight the positioning of mag-CellBank! as helping rural bank clients save time and money. Microloan borrowers do not need to travel to the bank to pay their loan amortizations. Using mag-CellBank/Text-A-Payment, they can pay their loans from wherever they are. Since they do not need to travel to the bank, they save on time and transportation costs. Through Text-A-Deposit, depositors can deposit to their account as frequently as they want and in small amounts. Because they can easily and conveniently make deposits, clients can build up their savings and avoid spending their savings on non-essential purchases. While Text-A-Withdrawal allows them to conveniently make withdrawals without having to come to the bank.

For banks, mag-CellBank! allows them to expand to areas that are otherwise, hard-to-reach. Account officers do not need to travel to these areas as frequently as when they had to make collections – they only have to schedule regular monthly monitoring visits. Because they no longer collect and carry money from the field back to the bank, account officers are less exposed to risks like highway robbery.

The benefits of mag-CellBank! are clearly seen in a place like Baungon, Bukidnon. Baungon is a 2nd class municipality about 45 kilometers south of Cagayan de Oro City. The municipality is accessible by a road that is mostly unpaved, narrow, and winding making travel difficult. Residents have to endure the dust during the dry season and slippery, muddy roads during the wet season. Despite the poor road infrastructure, Baungon is a thriving community. Agriculture is the main industry, with most of the residents growing cassava and papaya as contract farmers for big agricultural companies.

1st Valley Bank’s Cagayan de Oro City Branch expanded to Baungon in 2010 and is currently serving microloan borrowers from the area. The area’s distance from the branch, compounded by the rough roads, make weekly collections very costly for the bank. There are stretches of the road passing through forested areas where highway robberies and hold-ups have occurred even in broad daylight and this poses a very real danger for account officers who regularly have to collect and transport money.

On the other hand, traveling to the bank to pay their amortizations is very costly for the clients. They have to pay PHP85 (US$2) each way for the 35-minute jeepney or van ride.

DSCN58571-300x224Which is why microloan client Irene Paredes welcomes mag-CellBank! “This will now make it easy for me to pay my loans, I do not have to wait for the account officer anymore every week. My schedule is irregular, sometimes I have to run errands, so this (mag-CellBank!) is very convenient for me. I am also thinking about becoming a CICO partner – I know that are a lot of households here that have children studying outside Baungon – I may be able to serve their remittance needs”.

Until April 2012, staff of the three pilot banks will be promoting mag-CellBank, giving clients like Ms. Paredes opportunities to grow their businesses and increase their income, and enjoy the convenience of banking through their cellphones.

mag-CellBank! na tayo!

RBAP-MABS Holds Mobile Phone Banking & GCASH Accreditation Course for Northern Luzon Rural Bankers

The United States Agency for International Development-supported Rural Bankers Association of the Philippines–Microenterprise Access to Banking Services (RBAP-MABS) Program conducted a Regional GCASH Accreditation Training for North Luzon rural banks in Clarkfield Pampanga last October 28, 2011.

DSC078901The Globe GXI team – composed of their training team, North Luzon area managers, and the account manager and coordinator for rural banks – were present to facilitate the presentation and hands-on activities. Twenty (20) participants from 11 rural banks completed the training.

The eleven rural banks are: RB Bayombong, GM Bank, Vigan RB, RB Lingayen, Agribusiness RB, Cebuana Lhuiller RB, RB Central Pangasinan, Coop Bank of Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur Coop Bank, RB San Jacinto, and Commonwealth RB. Most of the participants said that the training was very timely, since they had always been interested in offering mobile phone banking services (MPBS). Representatives from GM Bank added to their enthusiasm when they shared the bank’s MPBS implementation. GM Bank is currently one of the MABS participating rural banks with the highest mobile phone banking transactions.

The training covered GCASH basics and bank policies and mobile phone banking procedures. Participants were also given hands-on exercises on how to do actual GCASH registration, person-to-person (P2P) and Cash-In/Cash-Out transactions. At the end of the training, banks were provided with accreditation kits and were taught how to proceed with the accreditation process.
The training covered GCASH basics and bank policies and mobile phone banking procedures. Participants were also given hands-on exercises on how to do actual GCASH registration, person-to-person (P2P) and Cash-In/Cash-Out transactions. At the end of the training, banks were provided with accreditation kits and were taught how to proceed with the accreditation process.

Mobile Money for the Developing World

By Michelle Chang Rodriguez
A rapidly increasing number of people across the globe are now staying connected to one another via a mobile phone device – whether it’s an iPhone, Nokia, or Samsung. In fact, the United Nations reported earlier this year that the worldwide figure for cell phone subscriptions had topped five billion at the end of 2010. According to the International Telecommunication Union, approximately 3.8 billion of these mobile subscriptions were from developing countries – with India and China fueling this upsurge.

Mobilebanking

As the number of mobile phone users rapidly increases across the world, the mobile financial services market is also booming, and is increasingly dominated by Asia. Photo by Karl Grobl.

As this trend continues, the mobile financial services market is also booming, and is increasingly dominated by Asia, driven by mobile, operator-led initiatives in these developing nations to “bank the unbanked.” Developing countries such as Pakistan are among those that have made remarkable progress in global mobile phone adoption; in 2007, while just one million Pakistanis owned bank accounts, 70 million were mobile subscribers. In April 2011, this total subscriber figure stood at 108 million. This rapid mobile subscription rise has the potential for even greater expansion among those living in the developing world with the enablement of these four mobile banking functions: government cash transfers, international remittances, bill payments, and savings.

Government-run welfare transfers

State-run welfare programs such as conditional cash transfer programs, or CCTs, provide cash transfers to poor mothers in rural areas based on the condition that they send their children to primary and secondary schools and to health clinics. Typically, monthly transfers are given to the head of the household, specifically used for food consumption, vaccinations, and school attendance. However, they require a well-developed infrastructure where money can be transferred. In countries such as Brazil, a well-developed banking sector helps in CCT implementation. Other developing countries like India may lack a mature enough banking system for a CCT program to launch. In these scenarios, alternatives to banks must be considered.

Mobile phones present a viable means for such cash transfers. Their widespread usage and low start-up costs are compelling reasons for CCTs to conduct transfers via mobile phones. In the Philippines, the Department of Social Welfare and Development’s Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) provides cash transfers to the country’s poorest families. Along with rural banks, mobile phones have become one of the most integral tools to facilitating cash transfers to these poor. Using the rural Green Bank’s “GCash” platform, bank personnel verify beneficiary data, including CCT ID, GCash transfer numbers, and cash amount, submits the ID to a specific text code, and within a minute, receives the amount that is approved for physical payout to the recipient. Such programs – and those specifically with mobile phone integration – hold a potential for providing the poor with easier and wider access to financial services.

Remittances

Similar to these government-run welfare cash transfer programs are the mobile cash transactions that take place for international remittances in developing countries. The World Bank estimated that the global formal remittance market at the end of 2010 was valued at approximately $440 billion, of which nearly 74 percent flowed into developing countries. In addition to the likes of Western Union and MoneyGram, mobile to mobile, mobile to cash, and cash to mobile mechanisms are increasingly helping to transfer cash across borders. In roughly five years’ time, the Global System for Mobile Communications Association (GSMA) forecasts that with the help of mobile services, this global remittance market could value over $1 trillion and reach two billion consumers. Mobile services also have the potential to offer deeper penetration among the rural and hard-to-reach communities where bank branches and ATM presence is low.

One popular example is that of Kenya’s Safaricom mobile-banking service, or M-PESA. Over SMS, Kenyans – many of whom don’t have their own bank accounts – are able to transfer money to another person’s mobile phone. The mobile cash recipient can then redeem the electric cash in conventional cash form from an M-PESA agent, of which includes retail outlets or mobile airtime resellers. In other words, the bank’s role is minimal.

Bill payments

Like its predecessor, M-PESA, Thailand’s True Money plays a similar mobile banking role, but with a bill payment model instead. True Money requires mobile users to enter their ID and password, and then head to the nearest 7-Eleven to add money from the store’s agent. The money on the user’s mobile account can then be used to “top up” mobile airtime minutes or pay for any True bills sans additional fees. Typically, for a value of a 50 baht (just over US $1.50) pre-paid airtime card, users pay an inflated price through retailers – up to 55 baht. By using mobile phones as transaction terminals, users pay 50 baht for a 50 baht value card.
While True Money had approximately seven million users as of 2010, it also faces the implementation challenges of insufficient vendor adoption. Until more retail stores accept True Money services, usage may not expand very quickly. However, True Money has begun to also shift into the online shopping realm. With the advent of bill payments comes more sophisticated ways of utilizing mobile banking, from online shopping to insurance premium payments.

Savings

Savings are an integral component of financial inclusion. For example, M-Kesho, which is linked to Kenya’s M-PESA users, allows mobile banking users to deposit money and even earn interest on it. However, few savings and deposit-making mechanisms currently exist through mobile banking. For one, savings through mobile phones still needs to be tied to a banking system. In Kenya, M-Kesho has partnered with Equity Bank to provide financial services to those who otherwise would not have access to credit and savings.

Still, this method of “banking the unbanked” requires some fine-tuning. Aside from risks of fraud and money-laundering, mobile banking operators sometimes don’t have the required banking licenses. Consequently, the number of these “corner stores” that act as mobile bank retailers is limited. In India, where M-PESA had launched a pilot money transfer service, regulators have pushed back, insisting that it partner with a licensed bank. In Afghanistan, a similar service, called M-PAISA, has been tested as a mobile currency for supporting salary payrolls, only to encounter initial problems of corruption. In 2009, the Afghan National Police began salary payments via mobile phone, but found that at least 10 percent of payments had been transferred to “ghost policemen” who never existed. Yet, M-PAISA’s partnership with the country’s Roshan mobile network reaches 230 cities in all of the country’s 34 provinces, covering its 12 million mobile subscribers out of nearly a 30 million population. Local corner stores, transformed into mobile “bank” branches, are on the rise, and are helping to disburse cash more widely.

Mobile money could have a huge impact in Asia. Not only is it faster, cheaper, and more efficient, but it is also a more feasible way to conduct cash transactions given the prevalence of mobile phone subscriptions across the developing world. In countries where banking infrastructure, roads, and post offices are limited, mobile phones can open access to financial services that many of these poor populations lack. In turn, time that would have been spent on long trips to banks can now be spent on more productive tasks. Mobile banking does present itself a compelling opportunity to more inclusively provide savings, credit, insurance, and payment services for the poor.

Visayas and Mindanao Rural Banks attend Mobile Phone Banking Accreditation Training Course

IMG_0306-1024x292Fourteen representatives from eight rural banks based in the Visayas and Mindanao attended the Mobile Phone Banking Accreditation training and refresher course at the Diamond Suites in Cebu City last September 9. The training was organized by the United States Agency for International Development-supported Rural Bankers Association of the Philippines-Microenterprise Access to Banking Services (RBAP-MABS) Program and co-sponsored by G-Xchange Inc. (GXI), a wholly-owned subsidiary and the mobile commerce arm of Globe Telecom.

The one-day training focused on the fundamentals of mobile phone banking services utilizing the GCASH platform. Among other essential topics discussed were contingency plans, security controls, reporting and monitoring transactions.

The training is designed for rural banks interested in becoming accredited by GXI to utilize the GCASH platform for mobile phone banking services. The training helps to ensure that all banks comply with the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas electronic banking standards.

Philippine Experiences in Mobile Phone Banking highlighted during the Asia Pacific Mobile Financial Services Summit

The United States Agency for International Development-supported Rural Bankers Association of the Philippines-Microenterprise Access to Banking Services (RBAP-MABS) Program joined mobile financial service stakeholders at the 5th Annual Mobile Financial Services – Asia Pacific Summit held at the Waterfront, Singapore on September 6-7, 2011. The annual conference gathers partners in mobile, banking, business and technology industries to build a robust and sustainable mobile commerce ecosystem.

Industry trends and challenges in the mobile financial services were discussed during the two-day summit. The impact of the near field communication (NFC) technology and smartphones were the highlights of the summit. Banks in countries including Singapore, Japan and Korea are now utilizing the power of smartphones in providing mobile financial services to their clients. The socio-economic impact and success of this innovation in the financial services space were recognized.

The USAID MABS Senior MIS Manager, Anthony Petalcorin, discussed the Philippine experiences in promoting mobile financial services during the second day of the summit. He shared how rural banks and other microfinance institutions entered into partnerships with mobile operators to promote and harness the benefits of mobile financial services. A case study featuring one of the participating banks of the RBAP-MABS Program was used to illustrate the challenges and benefits of partnering to offer mobile financial services. Opportunities for expanding access to financial services for microentrepreneurs and low-income households via mobile money was also highlighted during his presentation.

According to Ms. Rasheda Sultana, Senior Specialist of the Strategy Department of Grameenphone Bangladesh, Kenya posted the highest and fastest growth rate in mobile money services due to the environment and limited competing channels. However, she noted that the Philippine mobile financial services model is considered to be one of the best primarily due to the very positive regulatory enabling environment.

In general, the summit presented new dimensions and innovations that will help shape the future of mobile financial services. It also helped to create more linkages and connections among various stakeholders in the mobile financial services sector.

RBAP-MABS Holds Regional Mobile Phone Banking Accreditation Course for Luzon Banks

The Rural Bankers Association of the Philippines–Microenterprise Access to Banking Services Program (RBAP-MABS) in cooperation with Globe’s G-Xchange Inc. (GXI) conducted a regional GCASH accreditation training and refresher course on August 25, 2011 at the RBAP Conference Room in Intramuros, Manila. Thirty-three (33) participants from eighteen (18) rural banks from Luzon completed the course.

The training introduced the participants to the basic concepts and applications of mobile phone banking as an additional rural bank service. Ms. Letty Young of Globe Telecommunications discussed the fundamentals of GCASH and engaged the participants with hands on exercises: registration to GCASH, person-to-person (P2P) electronic money transfer and balance inquiry. Other topics essential to the successful implementation of mobile phone banking services (MPBS) were also discussed; such as developing a contingency plan and security and internal control measures.

 

Ms.-Lety-of-GlobeUpon accreditation, the rural banks will receive a more comprehensive training on GCASH and mobile phone banking services (MPBS) and practices. The rural banks represented during the training were the following: Bangko Nuesta Señora del Pilar, Bank of Makati, Country Rural Bank of Taguig, Gulf Bank, Key Rural Bank, Metro South Cooperative Bank, Quezon Capital Rural Bank, Rang-ay Bank (A Rural Bank), Rural Bank of Donsol, Rural Bank of Libmanan, Rural Bank of Gen. Luna Inc., Rural Bank of Itogon, Inc., Rural Bank of Jose Panganiban Inc., Rural Bank of Pamplona, Inc., Rural Bank of Paracale, Inc., Rural Bank of Sipocot, Rural Bank of Sta. Fe Inc. and Turumba Rural Bank of Pakil, Inc.

To date, RBAP-MABS has helped to accredit seventy-two (72) rural banks to offer mobile phone banking services. These banks have processed over PhP 12 billion in mobile phone banking transactions utilizing the GCASH platform.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by RBAP-MABS and whilst we endeavor to keep the information up-to-date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.